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By proadAccountId-337069 31 Aug, 2016

By Joe DePreta

In 1971, a genius Madison Avenue creative director named Bill Backer felt inspired to craft an idea for a Coca Cola commercial while waiting in an airport. Backer wrote the line "I'd like to buy the world a Coke" on a napkin, and shared it with British hit songwriters Peter Cook and Roger Greenaway . He envisioned hundreds of diverse people on an Italian mountain top singing “in perfect harmony.” In the decades since the commercial first aired, it has been both lionized and sneered at. One thing most people agreed on, though, regardless of the commercial’s affectation, is how it tapped into a universal truth. Music can indeed unite the world.

Today, in our climate of political and social polarization, music continues to be one of our universal commonalities. A Republican can fist pump to Bruce Springsteen while a Democrat sways to Keith Urban. It doesn’t matter. What matters is the way our individual choice of music makes us feel. It always amazes me how Americans can forget about differences small and large when the discussion turns to music. Bach vs Mozart. Beatles vs Rolling Stones. Punk vs classic rock. We’re passionately insatiable about bragging rights for the hidden musical trivia we think will enlighten and surprise the conversation. It’s just one of the fun ways music feeds and nurtures our collective core.

 

Throughout history, music has celebrated the triumphs and tragedies of life. Whether a Sousa march, an Eminem rap, or a Wagner dirge, it’s all good music. As Plato said, “Music gives soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination.”

 

Yet, one of life’s consistent regrets of adulthood is: “I wish I’d learned to play the (fill in the blank) when I was younger.” Yeah. Exactly. Who among us hasn’t fantasized about enlivening a dinner party with dexterity at the piano bench? Or picking up a Fender, plugging in and, while smiling up at the Gods, letting loose with a little surf riff?

 

The point is, it’s never too late. One of my college writing professors once told me that in order to write great fiction, it takes more courage than talent. What he meant, of course, is one has to have the courage to actually take the first step, sit down, and write. So it goes with music. If more of us learned to play, think of the possibilities. More accomplishment. More fulfillment. More creativity. Less time in front of a screen. More unity and collaboration.

 

Music instruction is one of the last great bargains of American life. Affordable instrument rentals are another option to get one to take that critical first step with minimum risk.  Stamford and Norwalk offers some of the best music instructors in the Fairfield County area.

 

Imagine. What an even more wonderful world it would be.
By proadAccountId-337069 31 Aug, 2016

By Joe DePreta

In 1971, a genius Madison Avenue creative director named Bill Backer felt inspired to craft an idea for a Coca Cola commercial while waiting in an airport. Backer wrote the line "I'd like to buy the world a Coke" on a napkin, and shared it with British hit songwriters Peter Cook and Roger Greenaway . He envisioned hundreds of diverse people on an Italian mountain top singing “in perfect harmony.” In the decades since the commercial first aired, it has been both lionized and sneered at. One thing most people agreed on, though, regardless of the commercial’s affectation, is how it tapped into a universal truth. Music can indeed unite the world.

Today, in our climate of political and social polarization, music continues to be one of our universal commonalities. A Republican can fist pump to Bruce Springsteen while a Democrat sways to Keith Urban. It doesn’t matter. What matters is the way our individual choice of music makes us feel. It always amazes me how Americans can forget about differences small and large when the discussion turns to music. Bach vs Mozart. Beatles vs Rolling Stones. Punk vs classic rock. We’re passionately insatiable about bragging rights for the hidden musical trivia we think will enlighten and surprise the conversation. It’s just one of the fun ways music feeds and nurtures our collective core.

 

Throughout history, music has celebrated the triumphs and tragedies of life. Whether a Sousa march, an Eminem rap, or a Wagner dirge, it’s all good music. As Plato said, “Music gives soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination.”

 

Yet, one of life’s consistent regrets of adulthood is: “I wish I’d learned to play the (fill in the blank) when I was younger.” Yeah. Exactly. Who among us hasn’t fantasized about enlivening a dinner party with dexterity at the piano bench? Or picking up a Fender, plugging in and, while smiling up at the Gods, letting loose with a little surf riff?

 

The point is, it’s never too late. One of my college writing professors once told me that in order to write great fiction, it takes more courage than talent. What he meant, of course, is one has to have the courage to actually take the first step, sit down, and write. So it goes with music. If more of us learned to play, think of the possibilities. More accomplishment. More fulfillment. More creativity. Less time in front of a screen. More unity and collaboration.

 

Music instruction is one of the last great bargains of American life. Affordable instrument rentals are another option to get one to take that critical first step with minimum risk.  Stamford and Norwalk offers some of the best music instructors in the Fairfield County area.

 

Imagine. What an even more wonderful world it would be.
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